Managing Challenging Behaviour NCFE Level 4:

‘The Management of Challenging Behaviour in Sexually Exploited Young People’

 

The Releasing Potential Institute offers an NCFE Level 4 course in ‘The Management of Challenging Behaviour in Sexually Exploited Young People’. The six-day course is the only training of its kind available to professionals, and leads to a Level 4 qualification for all learners who complete their assessment. The Level 4 NCFE qualification is equivalent to an NVQ4 (Foundation Degree year).

The training engages with current theories and offers practical strategies to those working with young people in a range of contexts; it aims to allow learners to better manage problem behaviours and develop meaningful interventions in their professional lives. Unlike other courses, ‘The Management of Challenging Behaviour in Sexually Exploited Young People’ focuses on professional practice and not government policy or strategic solutions to the growing problem of the sexual exploitation of young people.

As part of a specialist school for children who have been excluded from mainstream education, we provide course tutors who are experts in frontline delivery to children and young people who are either at risk of sexual exploitation, or have been/ are being exploited. Releasing Potential School offers bespoke education programmes to children with these sorts of issues, and we specialise in dealing with the behaviour that occurs as a consequence of sexual exploitation.

 

Level 4 Course Content

The Managment of Challenging Behaviour Level 4 course is comprised of five teaching areas:

Unit 1: Understanding Personal Responses to working with Sexually Exploited Children and Young People 

The learner will

1.0 Consider physiological and behavioural responses to stress and trauma in the context of work with sexually exploited young people

The learner can:

1.1 Describe, with reference to any relevant personal experience, the psychological and behavioural responses to stress that might occur in individuals with a working role in relation to sexually exploited children and young people.

1.2 Describe the features of trauma and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder with reference to work with sexually exploited children and young people.

1.3 Demonstrate two techniques for managing own stress or that of others when working with sexually exploited children and young people.

1.4 Produce a rationale for both techniques demonstrated

1.5 Evaluate the effectiveness of both techniques.

The learner will:

2.0 Demonstrate understanding of how socio-cultural factors influence approaches to sexual exploitation of children and young people and management of such exploitation.

The learner can:

2.1 Analyse the influence of the media on own and public attitudes and responses to the sexual exploitation of children and young people.

2.2 Consider how attitudes to the sexual exploitation of children and young people have differed across cultures and over time.

2.3 Reflect on how aspects of own culture and life events have influenced own response to the sexual exploitation of children and young people.

2.4 Identify and evaluate resources available that can promote self-care and limit potential stress and trauma reactions when working with sexually exploited children and young people.

Unit 2: Theoretical Perspectives on Challenging Behaviour in Sexually Exploited Children and Young People

The learner will:

1.0 Understand theoretical approaches to managing challenging behaviour in sexually exploited young people.

The learner can:

1.1 Summarise the range of current theoretical perspectives on managing challenging behaviour in sexually exploited children.

1.2 Explain the key tenets of current theoretical approaches to managing challenging behaviour in sexually exploited children and highlight potential conflicts and problems with specific theories.

1.3 Articulate well-argued personal opinions of theoretical approaches and demonstrate knowledge of the benefits and limitations of each approach.

1.4 Identify the place of Choice Theory and Recognition Theory in relation to theoretical perspectives on the management of challenging behaviour in sexually exploited young people.

The learner will:

2.0 Understand how theoretical perspectives are relevant to practice.

The learner can:

2.1 Explain the relevance of theoretical approaches specific to the learner’s professional context.

2.2 Select from the available theories those with most relevance to professional practice and evidence this relevance with examples from own experience/ practice.

 

Unit 3: Using Choice Theory and Recognition Theory to Understand Challenging Behaviour in Sexually Exploited Children and Young People.

The learner will:

1.0 Understand the impact of sexual trauma on students’ behaviour and experience of learning.

The learner can:

1.1 Explain the differences in physiology between the adult brain and the teenage brain.

1.2 Describe how sexual trauma may further impact decision-making processes by children and young people.

The learner will:

2.0 Understand the key principles of both Glasser’s Choice Theory and Honneth’s Recognition Theory in the context of social pedagogy.

The learner can:

2.1 Explain the key components of both Choice Theory and Recognition Theory, and give well-argued personal opinions

2.2 Assess the ways in which Choice Theory and Recognition Theory can be applied in the field of managing challenging behaviour in sexually exploited children.

2.3 Describe how Choice Theory and Recognition theory fit with current theoretical perspectives. 

The learner will:

3.0 Understand the implications of Choice Theory and Recognition Theory in their own setting.

The learner can:

3.1 Identify key ways in which the application of Choice Theory and Recognition Theory may affect their own working practice

3.2 Assess the effectiveness of applying either Choice Theory or Recognition Theory to own professional context.

 

Unit 4: Social Pedagogy in Curriculum Development and Delivery to Sexually Exploited Young People

The learner will:

1.0 Understand the relevance of social pedagogy as a model for working with young people

The learner can:

1.1 Explain the basic tenets of social pedagogy as an approach to working with sexually exploited children and young people

1.2 Demonstrate an understanding of the limits of social pedagogy

1.3 Consider the potential for using social pedagogy in their professional environment

The learner will

2.0 Understand the challenges of delivering education and/or support to sexually exploited children and consider how best to plan delivery

The learner can:

2.1 Explain the implications of sexual exploitation on children’s ability to learn and the impact of social pedagogical learning models

2.2 Identify the types of lessons and activities that can be effectively delivered to sexually exploited children with reference to social pedagogy

2.3 Plan sessions that suit the needs of sexually exploited children and young people or children and young people at risk of exploitation

The learner will:

3.0 Deliver a series of sessions to suit the evolving needs of a sexually exploited child with planned contingencies for challenging behaviour.

The learner can:

3.1 Evidence knowledge of techniques for delivering sessions that anticipate, and can be adapted in light of, challenging behaviour.

3.2 Deliver sessions that suit the needs of sexually exploited children.

3.3 Produce an artefact of co-production with a child or young person at risk of sexual exploitation, or a sexually exploited young person.

 

Unit 5: Practical Strategies for Managing Challenging Behaviour in Sexually Exploited Children and Young People

The learner will:

1.0 Learn to recognise and assess the complex needs of a sexually exploited young person.

The learner can:

1.1 Describe the sorts of challenging behaviours that sexually exploited children and young people will often present with.

1.2 Assess the complex needs of a sexually exploited child or young person.

1.3 Apply Choice Theory and Recognition Theory in assessment of challenging behaviour in sexually exploited children and young people.

The learner will:

2.0 Learn practical strategies for managing challenging behaviour effectively in a range of contexts

The learner can:

2.1 Describe a range of techniques for managing challenging behaviour in sexually exploited children and young people.

2.2 Explain how to select the appropriate skills to resolve the problems presented with reference to either Choice Theory or Recognition Theory.

2.2 Evidence continuous development of own skills and reflection on own practice.

 

Formal qualifications are not a requirement for the course, but learners are required to be working with children or young people at risk of sexual exploitation in their professional role. The qualification is assessed based on a portfolio of evidence from professional practice, including reflective statements, group presentations, in-class activities, practice observations from senior colleagues at work and co-production of work with young people. Portfolios can take between 12 and 24 months to complete after attending the six-day training, but 12 months is the indicative timescale for completion. Full support and guidance in the form of tutorials, web and telephone access to tutors and work placement opportunities (where necessary) will be given to any candidates undertaking the course. The course is most suited to experienced practitioners (Teachers, Instructors, Social Workers, Civil Servants, Local Government, or LSAs, TAs, and Classroom Assistants with extensive experience) or those working at a leadership level in community organisations or the third sector.

In order to take part in the course and complete the assessment, students need to be working regularly with young people; they also need the capacity to make detailed reflections on their own practice, and to contribute to discussions and group activities on the course. Assessment can be submitted in a range of media, for example video and audio recordings, but a good level of literacy is needed. The level of theory with which students are required to engage is significantly more complex than in the Level 3 course. *

The course is usually held at our Chichester school site, but can be delivered off-site on request. The course and qualification includes six days in the classroom, with tutorial support (via web, telephone and in person) and the opportunity for placement work if necessary. The course cost £1000 per candidate inclusive of VAT. This includes all materials, training, formative feedback and registration for the qualification and certificate.

Enrolment for the 2018/2019 acaedemic year will begin in June 2018 for a September 2018 start.

For an informal conversation about the format of the course or candidate suitability please call Dr Catherine Brennan or Dr Alex Gray at Releasing Potential on 02392 479762 or email us at institute@releasingpotential.com.

* Learners who have already completed our Level 3 course in ‘The Management of Challenging Behaviour’ may register to undertake additional portfolio work and attend two days on the Level 4 course at a cost of £400 to ‘top up’ their qualification to an NCFE Level 4.

Address:

Releasing Potential Institute
Unit 7 Kingscroft Court
Ridgway
Havant
Hampshire
PO9 1LS

Charity No: 1097440
Company No: 4622100

Telephone:

023 9247 9762

Email:

Institute@releasingpotential.com

 © Releasing Potential 2017